छत्तीसगढ़ में बिकता है गोबर, द्रौपदी ने दस दिन में कमाए 31 हजार

छत्तीसगढ़ सरकार गोधन न्याय योजना के तहत किसानों और पशुपालकों से गोबर खरीद रही है।

Major Impact on climate due to extension of Amery Ice Shelf (AIS), NCPOR study reveals

The National Centre for Polar and Ocean Research (NCPOR) predicts that there would be a 24% increase in the expansion of Ameri Ice Shelf (AIS) boundaries by 2021 and another 24% expansion by 2026 from its 2016 positions. The prediction made by NCPOR is based on a 16-year-long satellite-based observation that covered an area of 60,000 sq. km across the AIS. Scientists feel that this study would help understand the ongoing changes in the ocean and atmospheric forces better.

After studying the DNA from 3,000 rice accessions Researchers find a new possibility to improve rice productivity

In a new study, researchers from the Department of Biotechnology’s National Institute of Plant Genome Research (DBT-NIPGR), ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute (ICAR-IARI), ICAR-National Rice Research Institute (ICAR-NRRI), Cuttack and University of Delhi South Campus (UDSC), have identified a region in the genome of rice, which seems to have the potential for improving productivity.

Child Labour: With more than 7 lakh child labourers, MP among top 5 states in employing children

To understand the status of implementation and impact of recent amendments in Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act (CLPRA) 2016 in Madhya Pradesh, the Campaign against Child Labour (CACL), Hifazat Network in collaboration with CRY – Child Rights and organised a state level consultation in Bhopal on Saturday.
Representatives from Police Department of Madhya Pradesh, Department of Labour Madhya Pradesh, Childline and various Civil Society Organisations participated in the one-day long consultation at Pastoral Centre of Bhopal.
The CLPRA 2016 bans all child labour upto the age of 14 years. However, it makes an exception where a child is permitted to work only to help family, in family enterprise or as a child artist after school hours or during vacations.
Also, the current list of hazardous and non-hazardous occupations and processes (derived from the Factories Act 1948) is seen to have been framed considering the risks and challenges of the working adults but not the adolescents, and hence needs a thorough relook.

In the wake of recent amendments in Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act 2016, CACL, and Hifazat held a state level consultation in collaboration with CRY – Child Rights and You, where stakeholders converge to analyse status of implementation of CLPRA and the way forward
Photo- CRY


Addressing the consultation, Assistant Labour Commissioner, Bhopal Jasmine Ali said “According to Census 2011, Madhya Pradesh in among top 5 states where highest number of child labourers was registered. However, we are committed to improve this ranking and make MP child labour free. The work plan to end child labour is in place now and targets have been fixed for every district. We are constantly trying to make, the operational issues less complicated and fixing responsibility of police to register the FIR is one among the steps taken in this direction”
Talking about ground realities related to child labour in the state, senior IPS officer, Dr GK Pathak said “We have law in place to curb child labour but there is a need to strengthen the implementation process. Especially, in rural Madhya Pradesh, there is a need to develop a system where every child not attending school even for a small span of time should be tracked. Most importantly, while, rescue efforts are essential but without proper rehabilitation we cannot ensure a safe and happy childhood”.
According to the Census 2011, MP recorded total 7,00,239 child labourers. As MP is among 5 states that contribute in over 50% of the working children country, it becomes really important to understand the implications of amended CLPRA in the state.


Over 50% of the working children is concentrated in just 5 states (Census 2011)
Photo- CRY

Sharing his views on the status of child labour, Programme Head, CRY (North), Subhendu Bhattacharya said, “India’s national target set in National Plan of Action for Children (NPAC) 2016 as well as Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) clearly states that it will make all efforts to eliminate child labour by 2025. On the other hand according to census 2011, MP registered more than 7 lakh child labourers. The census also states that 60% child labour in the nation is concentrated in agriculture and allied sectors. Thus, in a state like MP where agriculture is the prime occupation it becomes really important to recognize and find solutions to curb child labour in agriculture as it is a huge challenge for children to balance work and education”.
“According to Sustainable Development Goals child labour should completely stop by 2025. It is a matter of concern how state government is going to do it when government does not even have exact numbers of child labourers”, shared State Convener of CACL, Rajeev Bhargava.
CACL members expressed that, the amendment in CLPRA Act 2016 fails to address its purported objective of prohibition of child labour from all occupations and processes. The legislation does not put family & family-based occupations, agriculture and allied sectors, sports & entertainment industry under the purview of the hazardous / non-hazardous list, legalising such work.
“The only way we can change the child labour scenario in MP is by working together to ensure children complete their formal education, so that they are not pushed to enter labour, and this cannot happen without total eradication of child labour from the country. The recent amendments in CLPRA needs a relook and we are ready to work with government and other stakeholders to find solutions and alternatives for the same,” Ashok Kumar, National Advocacy Convener at CACL, concluded.

National Girl Child Day: On an average 16 girls were kidnapped & abducted in Madhya Pradesh each day

On an average 16 girls were kidnapped or abducted each day in Madhya Pradesh in the year 2018. This has been revealed in latest National Crime Record Bureau’s (NCRB) report “Crime in India” -2018 released recently. According to the report, Madhya Pradesh registered third highest number of cases of kidnapping and abduction (K&A)of children among all states in the year. Total 7951 victims were recorded under the category of kidnapping and abduction where 72.53% victims were girls.

Shocking! Look who is behind the death due to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome in Bihar

The outbreak of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) in Bihar this year, which claimed the lives of more than 180 children, portrays the bad healthcare and infrastructure of the Bihar government. A few months after the outbreak, a group of journalists and social workers came up with a survey, showing the real cause behind this outbreak. The survey released on November 13 at Muzaffarpur says that 96.5 percent of children who were affected by Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) belonged to the underprivileged section and scheduled castes and tribes. The survey revealed that 97.8 percent of the family of children affected by AES could not earn more than Rs. 10,000 a month. The mainstream media had criticized government hospitals for allegedly not providing proper health care, but the survey revealed that 92 percent affected families appreciated the job of doctors and hospital staff. Pushya Mitra, a senior journalist and one of the prominent persons behind this survey tells us more about the findings of the survey. Please Subscribe and share this podcast.

Ground Tales: A tale of malnutrition-free village

Manish Chandra Mishra

Madhya Pradesh is ranked amongst few of the worst states of India in terms of nutrition and infant mortality rate. But there are some great initiatives taking place in small villages to overcome these issues that are worth sharing. Kotagunjapur, a village inside Panna Tiger Reserve has conquered malnutrition with kitchen gardens. The village that does not have access to roads and electricity has now attained freedom from malnutrition, something that even bigger villages and cities have been unable to achieve. Villagers realized that they are extremely poor and cannot afford dear vegetables from the market because of which their kids and women were not getting proper nutrition, leading to increase in malnutrition. Some social workers helped them develope kitchen-gardens in every household where they could grow iron and vitamin-rich vegetables and herbs. In a period of four years, the condition improved drastically. The villagers started getting fresh vegetables every day and that showed a positive impact on their health. The story about zero malnutrition villages is still untold. Ground Tales spoke to the social workers and the residents of Kotagunjapur to know more about the model and the struggle to make the initiative popular amongst villagers. We also interacted with activists behind this initiative who played a pivotal role in popularising the kitchen- garden concept to tackle the problem of malnutrition with a zero-budget plan. Listen to our podcast at http://www.groundtales.com

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Picture Tales #2: Abandoned farming instruments haunt the fields of villages as youth shifts to new professions

With every passing season, farmers are facing huge losses in farming. Due to the risk involved in farming sector, new generation is not interest in this field. This phenomena can be understood by these pictures where the new generation did not opt for farming as a profession. The fields and houses of villages near city are filled with abandoned farming instruments and the memories associated with them. Ground Tales brings some photographs with the series Picture Tales to show the emotional connection between farmers and abandoned instruments.

Photos by: Manish Chandra Mishra

Picture Tales #1: See the disastrous effects of backwater of Sardar Sarovar Dam in villages of Madhya Pradesh

Thousands of people have been evacuated from catchment areas of Sardar Sarovar Dam (SSD) in Barwani and Dhar districts in Madhya Pradesh as the Narmada river is flowing above the danger mark following heavy rains. Despite the protests of villagers the Gujarat government is not opening the gates of Sardar Sarovar Dam and with every passing minute the water level is increasing. The villagers are demanding proper rehabilitation and compensation from governments. Social activist Rehmat M shared the photographs of disaster with Grounds Tales.